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10 February 2017

St. Louis Design Principal Eli Hoisington Recognized as 40 Under 40 Leader

Eli Hoisington

The St. Louis Business Journal has announced its 2017 class of regional business leaders under the age of 40. Representing HOK on this year’s list is Eli Hoisington, design principal of the St. Louis office.

In honoring Hoisington, the Business Journal notes that the 39-year-old architect has ”designed towering $500 million skyscrapers in South Korea and spearheaded a $4 billion renovation of LaGuardia Airport in New York City.”

The article quotes former Anheuser-Busch President Dave Peacock, a client who looked to Hoisington to lead the design efforts for two St. Louis sports stadiums—a football venue next to the riverfront and a soccer stadium next to the city’s historic train station.

4_SC STL_View from West Upper Deck_Phase 1_Credit HOK

Said Peacock of Hoisington’s work: “Whether it was on the riverfront or next to Union Station as in the soccer stadium, I really appreciated how mindful he was for the surroundings. Part of the design of the soccer stadium is intended for soccer fans to have an open view of the Arch and other parts of the city, and those are things that I don’t think just anybody can bring to the table.”

Hoisington tells the Business Journal that for all the large projects he’s been fortunate enough to work on, it was the design of a relatively small project—an entryway project at New York Presbyterian Hospital—that he sees as the defining moment of his young career.

“We did a count and realized that little lobby at peak loads saw 1,200 people per hour and I realized that if I could make the experience better for those people for just the 10 minutes a day they were in there, that would be making a real difference,” said Hoisington. “I wanted to get back to doing things in my community and I was trying to figure out a way to do it.”

St. Louis Business Journal